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EHP Dec/Jan 2009/2010So it’s goodbye from us…
December/January

Like the serial reincarnation of the TV favourite Dr Who, this is the last issue of EHP before it morphs into a new publication, designed for the next decade. Launched in September 2005, EHP replaced its previous incarnation, Environmental Health Journal.

The next product to be published on 15 January will be the eighth version of the institute’s magazines originally launched in 1895 as the Sanitary Inspectors Journal. In 1902 the magazine changed into the Sanitary Journal, was replaced by the Sanitarian in 1932, The Public Health Inspector in 1964, and Environmental Health in 1968. It became EHJ in 1998 and will now live on as a bi-weekly carrying the name of our sister publication, EHN.

CIEH chief executive Graham Jukes explains in our interview how he expects the profession to change over the forthcoming years.

The new magazine is designed to meet the new needs of the CIEH and its members. Taking the best of EHP and the weekly EHN, it will be a combination of news, analysis, good practice, features, legal reports and legal analysis. It will also contain stories about the people who make up the profession, including retired members, new professionals and provide a profile. To ensure you are kept abreast of the news in the week when EHN is not published, EHN Extra will provide news, video clips and interactive features.

The five of us who work on EHP were involved in its launch five years ago. For such a small team we have held our own against editorial teams two or three times our size, having been shortlisted for awards as best Guild of Health Writer, PPA designer of the year, trade magazine of the year, IPA business magazine of the year and in October Nick Warburton was runner-up in the Guild of Health Writers best trade and specialist magazine category. To be judged so highly by your peers is a true accolade to the journalistic and design standards deserving of the environmental health profession. These standards maintained over five years will live on in the fortnightly EHN.

So from the EHP team, thank you for all your support and we wish you a happy Christmas and a prosperous new year.

Stuart Spear - Editor

Top stories:

CIEH - 'we have to specialise to remain relevant’
Swingeing budget cuts and a shift in regulation is helping to reshape the environmental health profession. CIE H chief executive Graham Jukes talks to Stuart Spear about the way ahead.

Public Health - Last Orders
After the success of the smoke free campaign David Gilliver investigates whether a similar strategy should be used to curb rising alcohol abuse.

Health and Safety- Price of Protection
A Conservative report on regulation highlights their plans to cut back drastically if they win the next general election. Nick Warburton speaks to its author, John Penrose, and asks CIEH leaders what this could mean for the profession.

International - Kigali Calls
UK EHPs are helping colleagues in Rwanda to train the next generation of health professionals. Stuart Spear reports on how one couple were prompted to lend a hand when they read about the work of the health institute in Kigali.

Public Health - Under the Spotlight
EHPs are using TV and radio to highlight the importance of public health, but critics fear such entertainments give a distorted view of the profession. Corin Williams reports.

Health and Safety - Shoulder the Load
Despite budget cuts, EHP s need to be more prepared to take enforcement action to protect employees and the public and to publicise their results, argues Ian Andrews.

Profile - Private paths
Phil Birch is one of the few EH Ps that has moved between the public and private sectors and also worked in academia. He talks to Nick Warburton about the future of the profession and how transferable skills have helped shape his career.

CIEH - Credit Where It’s Due
From its early beginnings as an attempt to prevent infections in motoway cafes, the CIEH’s awarding body has grown to provide a range of qualifications covering several industry sectors. Marianne Phillips.

Health and Safety - Laser Laws
High-power laser devices used for displays are becoming more widespread. James Stewart reports on new regulations that will help venues, operators and EHP s to protect workers and the public from harm