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New book published by the CIEH to mark 60 years of environmental improvement during the Queen’s reign

Publication Date: 30th January 2014

Subject: Public health

“Putting Wrong Things Right" has been published today by the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health (CIEH) highlighting the work of environmental health practitioners from 1952 to 2012.

In 2012, to mark the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, CIEH chief executive, Graham Jukes OBE, asked current and retired members to send in professional recollections and photographs from the previous 60 years. They responded in large numbers and this material has now been collated into a full-colour, 167-page, illustrated book.

In the first years of Queen Elizabeth’s reign, cities were darkened by smog and living conditions were generally primitive. But over the next 60 years the environmental health profession played a vital role in a public health revolution.

Mr Jukes said: “Putting Wrong Things Right shows how the members of a professional body, the CIEH, helped to make the UK a healthier and safer place. Since 1952 air quality has improved, the slums have been cleared and food has been made safer by the countless interventions of the environmental health profession.”

In words and pictures, “Putting Wrong Things Right” records in detail the London smog, the Aberfan disaster, slum landlord Peter Rachman’s terror tactics, outbreaks of smallpox and typhoid, the BSE crisis, awareness of climate change and countless unacknowledged but vital interventions that improved the quality of the nation’s life.

William Hatchet, editor, said: “It was a labour of love putting this book together. It’s an account of an aspect of UK history that is not often talked about – how improvements to our physical environment since the 1950s have been of great benefit to the nation’s health and wellbeing. The book is designed as a corrective to the current view that we are over-regulated or that all regulation is bad. It was particularly gratifying talking to the older members of the CIEH and capturing their memories of the early-1950s and 1960s, while they are still around to tell their stories.”

A short film introducing the book directed by Paolo Sedazzari and written by William Hatchett can be seen on YouTube.

“Putting Wrong Things Right”  

ISBN 978 1 906989 67 5
Normal price £19.99

Available to CIEH members for £14.99

Ends:

Notes to editors: 

  • For media enquiries please contact Brian Cowan on 020 7827 5922 or 07721 456727 or email b.cowan@cieh.org
  • Spokespeople editor William Hatchett and CIEH CEO Graham Jukes, are available for interview
  • Jpeg of the book cover is available

About the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health:

  • The CIEH is the professional voice for environmental health representing over 10,000 members working in the public, private and non-profit sectors. It ensures the highest standards of professional competence in its members, in the belief that through environmental health action people's health can be improved
  • The Chartered Institute of Environmental Health (CIEH) is a leading provider of accredited qualifications in health and safety, food safety, environmental protection, fire safety and first aid and operates in 50 countries. Over 10 million people around the world from the UK to the USA and the Middle East hold a CIEH qualification
  • The CIEH’s clients range from small businesses to multinational enterprises like the Intercontinental Hotel Group. We work with governmental bodies in Hong Kong as well as international agencies like the United Nations
  • The CIEH’s 60 qualification training programmes are delivered through a network of over 10,000 registered trainers. The training is developed for the varied skill levels within organisations. They cater to different learning styles and preferences through a series of flexible structures. CIEH qualifications are valued and recognised throughout the world
  • For more information about the CIEH visit www.cieh.org